Revision of North American species of Oxytropis de Candolle (Leguminosae) by Stanley L. Welsh

Cover of: Revision of North American species of Oxytropis de Candolle (Leguminosae) | Stanley L. Welsh

Published by E.P.S. Inc. in Orem, Utah .

Written in English

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Places:

  • North America

Subjects:

  • Oxytropis -- North America -- Classification.

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. 41-43) and index.

Book details

StatementStanley L. Welsh.
GenreClassification.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQK495.L52 W38 2001
The Physical Object
Paginationiv, 101 p. :
Number of Pages101
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3581194M
LC Control Number2002277396
OCLC/WorldCa49281349

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Reference: Welsh Revision N Amer Oxytropis. E.P.S. Unabridged Reference: Barneby Proc Calif Acad Sci Series IV ; Welsh Revision of North American species of Oxytropis de Candolle (Leguminosae), E.P.S., Orem, UT Index of California Plant Names (ICPN; linked via the Jepson Online Interchange) Key to Oxytropis.

"A Revision of the North American Species of the Genus Oxytropis, DC" is an article from Proceedings of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Volume View more articles from Proceedings of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

View this article on JSTOR. View this article's JSTOR metadata. Reference: Welsh Revision N Amer Oxytropis. E.P.S. Unabridged Reference: Barneby Proc Calif Acad Sci Series IV ; Welsh Revision of North American species of Oxytropis de Candolle (Leguminosae), E.P.S., Orem, UT.

Survey of arctic legumes with emphasis on the species concept in Oxytropis. In The species concept in the High North—a Panarctic flora initiative. Edited by I. Nordal and R. by: 9. Full text of "Revision of the North American species of Xanthium" See other formats ,5 FB V, cop, 2 FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY.

PUBLICATION BOTANICAL SERIES. VOL. IV, No. BY CHARLES FREDERICK MILLSPAUGH AND EARL EDWARD SHERFF. CHARLES FREDERICK MILLSPAUGH Curator, Department of Botany. Oxytropis DC., a genus belonging to the tribe Galegeae of Papilionoideae in the Leguminosae, comprises about species occurring in cold mountainous regions of Europe, Asia, and North America.

A Revision of the North American Species of Apios (Fabaceae) The revision of Apios in North America is based on morphological analysis of herbarium specimens as well as field and greenhouse observations. The genus is herein recognized as consisting of two distinct species in North America.

A new species of Oxytropis (Fabaceae: Papilionoideae) from India R evision of North American species of Oxytr opis de Candolle () Revision of the genus Oxytropis from W. Pakistan and N. Two major summary works on the North American species of Astragalus early in the 20th century, Marcus E.

Jones's revision and Per A. Rydberg's monograph for the North American Flora, differed greatly in their treatment of the genus, most notably with Rydberg's division of Astragalus into 28 genera and a larger number of sections. Oxytropis is a genus of plants in the legume family.

It is one of three genera of plants known as locoweeds, and are notorious for being toxic to grazing animals. The other locoweed genus is the closely related Astragalus.

There are about species, native to Eurasia and North America. Several species are native to the : Angiosperms. American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library.

Full text of "A revision of the North American species of beetles belonging to the family Bostrichidae". Andrew D. Miller, James F. Zachary, in Pathologic Basis of Veterinary Disease (Sixth Edition), Plant Toxins Astragalus, Oxytropis, and Swainsona Poisoning. Astragalus, Oxytropis, and Swainsona represent three genera of plants with species that are toxic to livestock.

As many as species of Astragalus grow in North America, and the genus is the largest of any. Introduction. Several species among two genera in the Fabaceae family, Astragalus and Oxytropis, are toxic to grazing livestock throughout North America, South America, and Asia (Marsh,Huang et al.,Cook et al., ).Many species within these genera are non-toxic and are important forages; however, others are toxic to both livestock and by: Hare-footed Locoweed (Oxytropis lagopus var.

conjugans) is a member of the Fabaceae (pea family). It is a perennial forb, having a stout taproot crowned by leaves and large, purple, attractive flowers.

Despite its attractiveness it has little interest for the horticultural trade. Plants can be poisonous to livestock, especially horses. Parts of the plant have medicinal properties and. Data Source and References for Oxytropis campestris var.

spicata (field locoweed) from the USDA PLANTS database: Name Search: Revision of North American species of Oxytropis de Candolle (Leguminosae).

Unpublished. CO, ND, SD, WA: Literature. Data Source and References for Oxytropis lagopus (haresfoot locoweed) from the USDA PLANTS database: Name Search Institut de recherche en biologie végétale, Université de Montréal. AB: Revision of North American species of Oxytropis de Candolle (Leguminosae).

Unpublished. Data Source and References for Oxytropis besseyi (Bessey's locoweed) from the USDA PLANTS database: Name Search Bessey's locoweed. Data Source.

Last revised by: Revision of North American species of Oxytropis de Candolle. Data Source and References for Oxytropis borealis var.

viscida (viscid locoweed) from the USDA PLANTS database: Name Search 8th ed. American Book Company, New York. MN: Literature: Revision of North American species of Oxytropis de Candolle (Leguminosae). Unpublished.

The taxonomy of Liliaceae has had a complex history since the first description of this flowering plant family in the mid-eighteenth century. Originally, the Liliaceae or Lily family were defined as having a "calix" (perianth) of six equal-coloured parts, six stamens, a single style, and a superior, three-chambered (trilocular) ovary turning into a capsule fruit at maturity.(unranked): Angiosperms.

The first complete chloroplast genome of Oxytropis bicolour Bunge is reported and characterized in this study. The whole chloroplast genome wasbase pairs in length with genes. Oxytropis lambertii has been considered to be one of the major locoweeds responsible for livestock poisoning on rangelands, but there has been much confusion as to its taxonomic identity.

The objective of this study was to conduct a field survey of several populations of each of the three varieties [var. lambertii Pursh; var bigelovii A. Gray; var. articulata (E. Cited by: Indeed, Barneby () in his revision of the North American species of Oxytropis cited two specific epithets older than that of O.

viscida. And Boivin (), in his attempt at summarizing the Canadian portion of the section, transferred the infraspecific taxa to O. lettcantha (Pallas) Pers. An examination of the type ofthat species Author: Stanley L. Welsh. Data Source and References for Oxytropis sericea (white locoweed) from the USDA PLANTS database J., B.

Reif, B.E. Nelson, and R.L. Hartman. Floristic studies in north central New Mexico, U.S.A. The Sangre de Cristo Mountains. Journal of the Botanical Research Revision of North American species of Oxytropis de Candolle (Leguminosae. Data Source and References for Oxytropis lambertii (purple locoweed) from the USDA PLANTS database: Name Search B., J.

Larson, B.F. Jacobs, B.E. Nelson, and R.L. Hartman. Floristic studies in north central New Mexico, U.S.A. The Tusas Mountains and the Jemez Mountains. Revision of North American species of Oxytropis de Candolle.

Rupert C. Barneby, his monumental contributions to the taxonomy ofAstragalus and his place among American botanists, is discussed. His twenty contributions in the seriesPugillus Astragalorum spanned fifteen years of his botanical development from an interested naturalist to an accomplished taxonomist in this extremely species-rich genus.

Author: Stanley L. Welsh. Oxytropis sericea is a species of flowering plant in the legume family known by the common names white locoweed, white point-vetch, whitepoint crazyweed, and silky is native to western North America from Yukon and British Columbia south through the Pacific Northwest, the Rocky Mountains, and the Great Plains.

This plant is a perennial herb growing up to about Family: Fabaceae. Distribution of Locoweed Toxin Swainsonine in Populations of Oxytropis lambertii Revision of the North American species of Oxytr opis D.C. Pr Re vision of North American species. Check other web resources for Oxytropis lambertii Pursh: PLANTS: USDA-NRCS Database of Plants of the United States and its Territories ; BONAP North American Plant Atlas of the Biota of North America Program: TROPICOS: Nomenclatural and Specimen Database of the Missouri Botanical Garden ; ILDIS: International Legume Database & Information Service.

texts All Books All Texts latest This Just In Smithsonian Libraries FEDLINK (US) Genealogy Lincoln Collection.

Books to Borrow. Top American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library. Full text of "Revision of the North American and West Indian species.

The species we now introduce was the first American of the genus discovered, all the others then known being natives of the old world. Inwhen De Candolle published the volume of the "Prodromus," containing the order Leguminosa, there were forty-nine species known, but then only this one American among them.

Deutsch: Spitzkiele, Fahnenwicken English: locoweeds suomi: Keulankärjet lietuvių: Drugišius русский: Остролодка.

texts All Books All Texts latest This Just In Smithsonian Libraries FEDLINK (US) Genealogy Lincoln Collection. Books to Borrow. Top American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library.

Open Library. Full text of "Revision of the North American and West. Lotus roudairei Bonnet and taxonomic relationships between African and North American species of the tribe Loteae (Papilionaceae).

Adansonia. Adansonia. 19(2)–   Nucleotide sequences of the plastidmatK gene and nuclear rDNA internal transcribed spacer region were sampled fromAstragalus L. (Fabaceae), and its closest relatives within tribe Galegeae, to infer phylogenetic relationships and estimate ages of diversification. Consistent with previous studies that emphasized sampling for nrDNA ITS primarily within either New World or Old World species Cited by: NEW FLOWERING PLANT RECORDS FOR THE NORTH OF MEXICO RICHARD SPELLENBERG Department of Biology presence there overlooked in a recent revision.

Welsh, S.L. Revision of North American species of Oxytropis de Candolle (Leguminosae). S., Inc., Orem, Utah. Title. As currently understood, Phrymaceae consists of about species in 13 genera.

Erythranthe ( species) and Diplacus (46 species) are much larger than the other genera. Phrymaceae is distributed nearly worldwide but with the majority of species in western North America (about species) and Australia (about 30 species).Clade: Tracheophytes.

SPECIES: Oxytropis sericea GENERAL DISTRIBUTION: White locoweed occurs from the Yukon Territory east to Manitoba and south to Nevada, New Mexico, and Texas [ 42 ].

It is commonly found in the Great Plains, throughout the Rocky Mountains, and in the Pacific Northwest [ 11. Originally, Oxytropis was included in Astragalus, but De Candolle recognized two genera by splitting Oxytropis from Astragalus based on morphological traits. The flowers of Astragalus have an obtuse keel and bilocular pods due to the septum arising from the ventral suture, whereas those of Oxytropis have a mucronate keel and bilocular pods (due Cited by: This page shows two varieties of the species Oxytropis deflexa, one found in the montane and subalpine and the other found in the alpine.

"Oxytropis" is Latin for "sharp keel" and refers to the abruptly pointed tip of the keel petal, a characteristic that separates this genus of Fabaceae from two other prominent Fabaceae genera, Astragalus and Hedysarum.

North American Arctic species and Dizkirici Tekpinar et al. (a, b) and Kholina et al. () investigated those from Turkey and Asian Russia, respectively.

Given the taxonomic complexity of this genus, efforts towards a genus-wide taxonomic revision are therefore especially needed. In plant groups where species show low genetic differenti-Cited by:.

Madroño. Sign In View Cart Help.Acalypha is a genus of flowering plants in the family is the sole genus of the subtribe is one of the largest euphorb genera, with approximately to species. The genus name Acalypha is from the Ancient Greek ἀκαλύφη (akalúphē) ("nettle"), an alternative form of ἀκαλήφη (akalḗphē), and was inspired by the nettle-like : Angiosperms.Dec., I RYDBERG - NORTH AMERICAN FABACEAE species should be regarded as the type.

Greene contended that the genus is the same as the later Oxytropis DC. and should supplant it. This is not true, however, for only 4 out of the 12 species belong to De Candolle's genus. Further notes will be given under Oxytropis.

Spiesia Necker was.

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